Sample Lessons

Dr. Bob’s Comprehension Strategy Lessons

Civil War Thematic Inquiry Study

Download complete sample lesson:  Civil War Thematic Inquiry Study

Magazine Articles, Textbooks, Newspapers, Information Books

Download complete sample lesson and graphic organizer PDF: Predicting:Confirming nonfiction

 About the strategy:

Making predictions and confirming or changing them as you read is one way to keep your mind engaged throughout a text to better understand what is actually important to remember.

Predictions are not just guesses.  Readers use evidence from making personal connections to experiences and other texts as they read to make informed predictions. 

The organizing elements of informational texts are main ideas and pertinent details. You make predictions about what are the most important points and the supporting details in a text before, during and reading to keep your thinking focused. You confirm or change your predictions during and after reading to help you understand the text better.

Informational text has a variety of text supports that are designed to assist a reader in finding and understanding information quickly:

Text Organizers – Preface , Table of Contents, Index,  Glossary,

Fonts and Special Effects – Tiles, Headings, Bold Print, Captions, Labels

Graphics – Photographs, Diagrams, Maps, Graphs, Charts

Textual Clues – for example, for instance, in fact, in conclusion, but 

The Common Core now requires you to be able to cite both explicit and implicit textual evidence.  This strategy is interconnected to inferencing. The two guiding questions to always be asking readers is:

1st  What do you predict about__________?

2nd  How do you know? or What is your textual evidence?

Before reading:

Preview and Connect.

Read the title, scan the text an notice the  Title, headings, illustrations, maps, diagrams, captions and other supports.

Think about any connections you can make with your experiences and any books or articles, chapters that you have read.

Focus your thinking on predicting the possibilities of what are going to be the main ideas and important details in the text.

Write down your predictions on the graphic organizer or on post-its to put on a large poster of the organizer and explain what is the evidence from the text supports or text that makes you believe that you predictions were correct or not.

During reading:

Confirm or change predictions

Continue to make connections with your experiences and books you have read to help you understand what is most important in the text.

Confirm or change your your predictions about the main ideas and important details.  Determine importance of details as you read.  Not all details are worth remembering.

Think about why you have decided to confirm or change your predictions.

Write down your confirmations, changes and new predictions and explain your thinking citing textual evidence.

After reading:

Continue to make connections with experiences and other texts you have read.

Continue to think about your predictions and the confirmations and changes you made and why they were made.

What were the author’s clues that were most important in your confirming predictions?

What predictions were most helpful in understanding what was most important to remember?

Variations:

Can be done in whole group as a demonstration through

Readaloud-Thinkaloud.

Can be done in Think-Pair-Share groupings.

Can be done in triads or in cooperative learning groups.

Can be done with lap boards.

Can make lists of details and decide what details are most important for understanding and make a case for why or why not.

Can have students list all the headings or all the graphics and captions and and make predictions and confirm.

Variations for second language learners:

Utilize just the illustrations and graphics to build and scaffold vocabulary.

Can stop at any point to have students do a quick Sketch-to-Stretch.

Variations with technology.

Can be done with e-readers by clicking on “notes” and recording your predictions, confirmations and underlining textual evidence.

Texts can be downloaded and presented on smart boards where demonstrations can be made and saved to be reviewed at a later time.

See graphic organizer.

Download complete sample lesson and graphic organizer PDF: Predicting:Confirming nonfiction

Picture Books, Novels, Short Stories, Poetry

Download complete sample lesson and graphic organizer PDF: Predicting: Confirming Strategy

About the strategy:

Making predictions and confirming or changing them as you read is one way to keep your mind engaged throughout a story to better understand what is actually happening.

Predictions are not just guesses.  Readers use evidence from making personal connections to experiences and other texts as they read to make informed predictions. 

The organizing elements of a story are characters, plot and setting. You make predictions about who the characters are, what might be happening in the plot and the location and time period of the setting before and during reading to keep your thinking focused. You confirm or change your predictions during and after reading to help you understand the story better.

The Common Core now requires you to be able to cite both explicit and implicit textual evidence.  This strategy is interconnected to inferencing. The two guiding questions to always be asking readers is:

1st  What do you predict about__________?

2nd  How do you know?  or What is your textual evidence?

Before reading:

Preview and Connect.

Read the title, scan the book cover or any illustrations.

Think about any connections you can make with your experiences and any books you have read.

Focus your thinking on predicting the possibilities of who the characters might be, what might happen in the plot of the story and where and when the story is taking place.

Write down your predictions on the graphic organizer or on post-its to put on a large poster of the organizer and explain what is the evidence from the illustrations or text that makes you believe that you predictions were correct or not.

During reading:

Confirm or change predictions

Continue to make connections with your experiences and books you have read to help you understand what is happening in the story.

Confirm or change your your predictions about the characters, plot and setting.

Think about why you have decided to confirm or change your predictions.

Write down your confirmations, changes and new predictions and explain your thinking citing textual evidence.

After reading:

Continue to make connections with experiences and other books you have read.

Continue to think about your predictions and the confirmations and changes you made and why they were made.

What were the author’s clues that were most important in your confirming predictions?

What predictions were most helpful in understanding the story?

Variations:

Can be done in whole group as a demonstration through

Readaloud-Thinkaloud.

Can be done in Think-Pair-Share groupings.

Can be done in triads or in cooperative learning groups.

Can be done with lap boards.

Variations for second language learners:

Utilize just the illustrations to build and scaffold vocabulary.

Can stop at any point to have students do a quick Sketch-to-Stretch.

Variations with technology.

Can be done with e-readers by clicking on “notes” and recording your predictions, confirmations and underlining textual evidence.

Texts can be downloaded and presented on smart boards where

demonstrations can be made and saved to be reviewed at a later time.

 

See graphic organizer.
Download complete sample lesson and graphic organizer PDF: Predicting: Confirming Strategy

 

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